Sept. 22: Saint Paul Mayoral Candidate Forum

At Metropolitan State University, we believe it important to facilitate a campus climate of civic engagement and that our students become aware of what happens in their community.

The university prides itself on serving one of the most diverse student populations in the state of Minnesota, and student organizers are delighted to host this vital forum for our community. In advance of the Nov. 7 general election, Metropolitan State will host a mayoral candidates forum, 6 to 9 p.m., Friday, Sept. 22, in the Great Hall of New Main, Saint Paul Campus, 700 E. 7th Street.

Candidates confirmed to attend are:

The candidates are seeking the office that will be vacated by Mayor Chris Coleman, who has announced that he will not seek a fourth mayoral term and instead will run for Minnesota governor.

Matt Filner, associate professor of political science, will moderate. While the topics for discussion will vary, the event theme will emphasize higher education. Audience participants will be able to submit questions for the candidates. This will be a great opportunity to learn more about the mayoral candidates and inquire where they stand on issues that matter to you and your community.

The forum is free and open to the public. The university invites its community partners and neighbors in Dayton’s Bluff and Saint Paul’s East Side to attend. On-site ramp parking will be available at no cost. Contact the Metropolitan State University Student Senate at 651.793.1554 or student.senate@metrostate.edu for more information.

According to Student Senate President Dhibo Hussein, “As a student government organization, we recognize that every voice matters and that collectively our voices can have a profound impact. We also value the importance of making informed decisions, which is why we would like to equip our Metropolitan State University community with direct access to candidates to help aid in their decision making.”

 

Sept. 14: Student forum to address DACA

An event for Metropolitan State students to discuss the recent announcement from President Donald Trump concerning the future consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals in the United States.

In keeping with the message sent by Metropolitan State President Virginia Arthur affirming the university’s commitment and support for students, event planners intend to create spaces for healing, conversation, and sharing of resources to those directly affected.

The discussion on Thursday, Sept. 14, Saint Paul Campus, Student Center, room 101, will be an opportunity for faculty, staff and the community to show their support. The fight for dignity and respect for all immigrants is a humanitarian issue that affects us all, and this is a time of great uncertainty and angst for many. This day is dedicated to supporting those affected, creating an environment for conversation and learning, promoting campus resources and building solidarity. Refreshment will be provided.

AGENDA:

  • 1 p.m.: Check-in and welcome, Student Senate leaders
  • 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.: Healing circles for students, facilitated by Dr. Raj Sethuraju (concurrent counseling service available nearby with Michael Peterson)
  • 1:45 to 2:45 p.m.: “Discussion: What does DACA mean to you and our students?,” facilitator to be determined. Political analysis and resources for undocumented students available on campus; facilitator to be determined.
  • 3 to 3:45 p.m.: “What can we do, what shall we do, what will you do?” facilitated by Karina Moreno DeSilva
  • 3:45 to 4 p.m.: Closing and next steps

Staff must use personal time to participate and must arrange approval from their supervisor or use personal time to attend the event.

Contact the office of Craig Morris, university chief diversity officer/affirmative action director, at 651-793-1272 with questions.

Oct. 12: Metropolitan State University Annual Storm Water Meeting

Urban storm water runoff contains heavy metals including lead, organics such as pesticides, and nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus in threatening quantities that cause water quality problems in the receiving water bodies — lakes, streams and rivers.

Metropolitan State University is participating with adjoining cities and communities across the country to clean up storm water and reduce flooding in order to improve our public waters for recreational and environmental use. University efforts will be discussed at the annual Storm Water Information Meeting. Students, staff, faculty and community members are invited.

Jim Tiggelaar, PE, CCS, LEED AP, a civil project manager for LHB Corporation will be present to unveil the university’s plan and answer questions.

Time: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
When: Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017
Where: Metropolitan State University
Science Center, Room 115

Feel free to bring your lunch.

Sept. 16: Fall Fest

Metropolitan State’s annual homecoming celebration, Fall Fest, will be from 12:30 to 4 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 16 at the Saint Paul Campus.

Fall Fest is coordinated by the student-run University Activities Board. The festival is free, open to the public and family friendly, and features a variety of carnival-style activities, games, attractions, professional entertainment, free food, great music, and giveaways. The festival also includes a resource fair featuring student organizations and departments. The theme this year is “Fall Fun Since ‘71” and celebrates the university’s evolution and achievements through an exhibition of “history highlights” from 1971 to the present.

Free mental health services for students and university employees

Students who are struggling with a mental health issue can access free services, including individual and group counseling. Call 651-793-1568 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., weekdays to schedule an appointment.

Free mental health screenings are available through the Counseling Services webpage.

If you are a faculty or staff member struggling with a mental health issue, help is available through the LifeMatters Employee Assistance Program, 1-800-657-3719.

If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

Suicide Prevention Week, Sept. 10-16: Learn to recognize the signs

September 10-16 is national recognized as Suicide Prevention Week. Metropolitan State University is launching efforts to reduce and prevent suicide by providing gatekeeper trainings, which teach participants to recognize signs of distress in people and to connect that person to helpful resources. You can help to prevent suicide at Metropolitan State University.  Suicide is all of our business, and everyone can play a role to prevent suicide.

Events are planned across several campus locations this week. Representatives from the Suicide Awareness Leadership Team will teach the warning signs of suicide and promote upcoming gatekeeper trainings at the following times and locations:

  • 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday, Sept. 11, Saint Paul Campus, Student Center
  • 4 to 6 p.m., Monday, Sept. 11, Minneapolis Community & Technical College, 1501 Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis
  • 4 to 6 pm., Thursday, Sept. 14, Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Education Center, 9110 Brooklyn Blvd, Brooklyn Park.
  • Information on the warning signs of suicide and gatekeeper training will be available all week at the Midway location.

Gatekeeper training teaches individuals the warning signs of distress, how to respond, and how to refer the person to services. Two options are available, Kognito and Mental Health First Aid.

Kognito is a 45-minute online self-paced training for faculty and staff, and uses role-playing to teach how to recognize when a student is in crisis and refer them to the appropriate services. There is a general module, a veteran module, and a LGBTQ module. Kognito can be accessed by going to kognitocampus.com. The enrollment key for Kognito is “MetroState.”

Mental Health First Aid is an eight-hour in-person course for faculty, staff, and students, which teaches the risk factors and warning signs of mental health and substance use related crises, and how to recognize a problem, give reassurance, and refer them to seek professional help. The first session will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 28, and Thursday, Oct. 5 in the Library and Learning Center,  Room 310. Register at this link on eventbrite.com.

Contact Cassandra Shaker (cassandra.shaker@metrostate.edu) with questions.

Dash Grant provides emergency funds to students in need

Great Lakes logo

Car broke down and no money to repair it? Unexpected medical expenses making it hard to pay bills? Electricity or gas about to be shut off?  Undergraduate students who find themselves in a financial crisis which could put their academic success at risk can apply for the DASH Grant.

Metropolitan State University has received a $420,000 Dash Emergency Grant from Great Lakes Higher Education Corporation & Affiliates to operate and maintain a student emergency aid program. Emergency grants will be integrated into the college’s overall student success strategy with the goal of improving retention and completion rates. Metropolitan State is one of the first four-year universities to receive this grant.

“Thanks to the Dash Emergency Grant, Metropolitan State has the resources to provide modest emergency grants to our students in times of acute and unexpected need,” said university President Virginia Arthur. “Most of our students work while attending classes, and many have limited financial resources. That means that, even when the semester is going according to plan, our students struggle to manage work, studies, family, and other commitments. Any number of disruptions can occur—problems with health, family members, automobiles, jobs—and students suddenly find themselves unable to continue their programs. Often a modest supplement can make the difference between continuing to completion and stopping out, which often leads to protracted stopping-out and derails life plans and hopes. Great Lakes has zeroed in on a potent but solvable threat to student success.”

Students who qualify will receive a one-time payment of up to $1,000 to help relieve the stress of an unexpected financial hardship. For qualifications and  to learn more about applying for the Dash Grant, go to www.metrostate.edu/dash.

 

Sept. 22: “Honor-Based Violence, A Local Response to Global Challenges”

Metropolitan State associate professor of criminal justice James Densley and Inspector Allen Davis of the Metropolitan Police Service in London.

Inspector Allen Davis of the Metropolitan Police Service in London will visit Metropolitan State University to discuss the United Kingdom National Police response to honor-based violence (prosecution, protection, prevention, partnership) and advise on how Minnesotans can develop a multiagency response to the violence hidden from view in our communities.

Inspector Davis joined the Metropolitan Police Service in 1996 and leads the partnership team in the Child Abuse and Sexual Offences Command, a specialist unit of 1,300 officers responsible for child protection and rape investigation in London. He leads Project Azure, Scotland Yard’s strategic response to female genital mutilation and breast ironing, and Project Violet, the response to child abuse linked to faith or belief (e.g. witchcraft and spirit possession). Inspector Davis is also national lead for Operation Limelight, a high-profile, multi-agency safeguarding operation deployed at the UK border. Operation Limelight focuses on a range of harmful practices, including human trafficking.

The program will be 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 22
Metropolitan State University, Saint Paul Campus
Library and Learning Center, room 302 (Ecolab)

Click here to download the event flyer

Light refreshments will be provided. This event is co-sponsored by the Metropolitan State’s School of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice and the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office. Contact James Densley at james.densley@metrostate.edu.

Oct. 11: Sally Sudo to speak on WWII internment camps

The Department of History, Department of Ethnic and Religious Studies, and the Institute for Community Engagement and Scholarship (ICES) invite all students, employees and community members to an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary of a tragic chapter in U.S. history.

February 19, 1942: A Day the Constitution Died
Race, Gender and Citizenship—Incarceration of Japanese-Americans during World War II and Implications for Today

11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 11, Library and Learning Center, LIB 302, Ecolab

Guest speaker Sally Sudo will recount a first-person historical account of incarceration.

The moderator will be Dr. Kathleen Laughlin, Department of History. Light refreshments are provided.

In the News: Century-old ‘work college’ model regains popularity as student debt grows

…the idea of a work college is drawing renewed interest, thanks to rising student debt, skepticism about the financial payoff of a liberal arts education and employer complaints that graduates aren’t prepared for jobs. The fact that work colleges get extra funding under a little-known federal program also hasn’t hurt.

Century-old ‘work college’ model regains popularity as student debt grows

Twin Cities Public Television interviews professor Nicholas Hartlep.

A newsletter for the Metropolitan State University community