Tag Archives: Gordon Parks Gallery

Through July 12: “When Home Won’t Let You Stay” refugee accounts featured in Gordon Parks Gallery exhibit

 

 

Photographic portraits are featured in “When Home Won’t Let You Stay,” a solo exhibition by Winona artist James A. Bowey presented at Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery.

In a penetrating exploration of America’s evolving attitudes toward refugees, documentary artist James A. Bowey traveled Minnesota to meet refugees, hear their stories and photograph their portraits. The photographs were taken on location in a setting of the portrait subject’s everyday life. Bowey interviewed each person and their first-person story accompanies their photograph. The people in this exhibition share poignant stories of violence and loss, as well as perseverance and hope; and their images and experiences produce a compelling human portrait of refugees in Minnesota.

James A. Bowey
James A. Bowey speaks about how he came to develop his photojournalism project “When Home Won’t Let You Stay.”

“The number of globally displaced people has risen dramatically in recent years, and is expected to continue to rise in response to ongoing conflicts, poverty, and climate change. However, fears of terrorism and economic dislocation have created social and political pressure to exclude refugees from the United States. These challenges force us to consider the basic human rights of all, and our global responsibilities to others,” Bowey says.

“In addition to the exhibition of portraits and stories, the artist will host a live community conversation to consider the plight of refugees, and the social divisions that have emerged in response to the humanitarian crisis.  This panel discussion will include a number of refugees living in the Twin Cities area. The event will take place in the Ecolab Community Room (adjacent to the gallery) from 7 to 8 p.m. on reception night,” Gallery Director Erica Rasmussen says.

The exhibit opens with a reception from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 19. The exhibit will be on display through July 12. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesday to Thursday. The gallery is located at the university’s Saint Paul Campus on the third floor of the Library and Learning Center, 645 East Seventh Street.

For more information about the exhibit, contact Erica Rasmussen, gallery director, at 651-999-5942 or e-mail her at erica.rasmussen@metrostate.edu. Rasmussen was recently honored with the 2018 Minnesota Book Artist Award for her work, “The Love Affair,” a mixed-media book handcrafted from love letters sent between her maternal grandparents in the 1930s.

Through April 12: Gordon Parks Gallery Student Salon 2018 undergraduate art exhibit

Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery presents Student Salon 2018.

The gallery features multimedia works by Metropolitan State University students enrolled in undergraduate programs. Mediums include anything from functional ceramics to watercolor portraits. This exhibit surveys the diverse form and content explored in class and beyond.

“This year’s exhibition features work produced by seven Studio Arts majors.  Some of the work was created in the classroom as part standard assignments.  Other pieces were executed beyond the university as part of the students’ individual interests. Whatever the inspiration, it’s a pleasure for me to share the culmination of their artistic pursuits with the university community,” gallery director Erica Rasmussen said.

Local student artists include: Marcia Alexander (Minneapolis), Ellen Antonov (Lexington), Daniel Blees (North Saint Paul), Tanner Chergosky (Blaine), Chelsea Engen (Eagan), Kimberly Niosi (Prior Lake), and Tiana Wright (Brooklyn Park).

The exhibit opened with a reception March 22 and is on display through April 12. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Gordon Parks Gallery is located in the Library and Learning Center, 645 East Seventh Street, at the university’s Saint Paul Campus.

“I will be showing pieces from my photo series ‘Rice Bowl,’ taken all throughout Southeast Asia,” says artist Tanner Chergosky, whose work will be featured in the gallery. “I love traveling to remote places and getting out of my comfort zone and that’s exactly what I did.”

(Works by Chergosky)

“My life has been a collection of individual parts that has been collected into a whole life,” says featured artist Daniel Blees. “At a glance, I’m a combination of those experiences but look closer and you’ll see all those pieces. I recreate that by making artwork that requires a second, closer look to see the individual pieces.”

Screen Shot 2018-02-22 at 1.16.08 PM.pngScreen Shot 2018-02-22 at 1.16.16 PM.png

(Works by Blees)

Noisi dabbles in mixed media, acrylics, and some clay sculpture work.

“We as a people are increasingly more and more interdependent with one another i.e. relationship, participants may be emotionally, economically, ecologically or morally reliant on one another therefore responsible to each other,” says Niosi while discussing her sculpture below.

“An interdependent relationship can arise between two or more cooperative autonomous participants. My inspiration for this piece was an affixed set of gears more specifically how the gears meshed together to create torque.”

Screen Shot 2018-02-22 at 1.19.15 PM.png

For more information about the exhibit, contact Erica Rasmussen, gallery director, at 651-793-1631 or e-mail her at erica.rasmussen@metrostate.edu.

Featured image from Kimberly Noisi used with permission.

 

 

April 1: Application deadline for Annual Art Purchase Awards

In an effort to encourage the growth and development of studio artists among its students and alumni, and to elevate the profile of the arts on campus, Metropolitan State University has committed to sponsor an annual art purchase and competition.

Students and alumni may submit up to six works annually.  This year there is a special purchase from the library that will allow faculty to submit up to six works as well. All subjects, media and forms are welcome. Four works will be purchased for $1,000 each.

Applications are due on April 1. Incomplete and late applications will not be considered.  A decision regarding the work selected for purchase will be made by the end of spring semester.  All applicants will be notified shortly thereafter.

Hard copy entry forms are available at The Gordon Parks Gallery.  Electronic versions of the entry form are available in the links below. Questions about entries can be sent to Amy Sands at 651-999-5963 or Amy.Sands@metrostate.edu.

Submissions will be reviewed by the Art Exhibition Committee, consisting of students (appointed by the Student Senate), faculty (appointed by the Inter Faculty Organization) and staff members (academic and administrative, appointed by the president and Executive Council).

The committee may request that works under consideration for purchase be lent to the university for the AEC to review firsthand.  In such a case, the artist will be contacted by an AEC member and arrangements will be made for a brief loan period.

Generous donors include the Office of the President, Academic Affairs, the Alumni Association, the Library Endowment, and the Student Senate.

‘The Human Anomaly’ at Gordon Parks Gallery

Mixed media drawings explore humanity’s need to organize and control the natural world in “The Human Anomaly,” a solo exhibition by Minneapolis artist John Schuerman presented at Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery.

“I use drawing as a way of locating human ideas in nature.  I map out concepts, for example a mathematical model or a game diagram, and compose them of natural patterns. I’m corralling the physio in conceptual forms and conversely, deconstructing the forms with the patterns of nature.  I draw as realistically as I can to emphasize the contrast between human and nonhuman expression. I wonder (and enjoy) how the products of consciousness are so different from the natural world producing them,” Schuerman says.

“Through exquisitely executed drawings of natural elements, such as flowers, rocks, clouds and dust, Schuerman ruminates on complex philosophical questions,” says gallery director Erica Rasmussen about the exhibit. “In addition to drawings hung on the walls, I’m especially excited to include a short film in the gallery. With the assistance of digital technologies Schuerman has animated his drawings into a time-based ephemeral experience.”

The exhibit opens with a reception from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 25, with a gallery talk by the artist at 7 p.m. The exhibit will be on display through Feb. 22. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesday to Thursday. The gallery is located at the university’s Saint Paul Campus on the third floor of the Library and Learning Center, 645 East Seventh Street.

For more information about the exhibit, contact Erica Rasmussen, gallery director, at 651-999-5942 or e-mail her at erica.rasmussen@metrostate.edu.

Oct. 26: “We Are Anishinaabe: Honoring Textile Traditions” exhibit reception at Gordon Parks Gallery

Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery presents “We Are Anishinaabe: Honoring Textile Traditions,” a group exhibition of Native American design and crafted art by Delina White, Sage Davis and Lavender Hunt, all of Walker, Minn., and enrolled members of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe.

Great Lakes Woodland Skirts Artists Portrait

 

The exhibit opens with a reception from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 26, with a gallery talk by the artists at 7 p.m. The exhibit will be on display Oct. 31 through Nov. 22. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesday to Thursday. The gallery is located at the university’s Saint Paul Campus on the third floor of the Library and Learning Center, 645 East Seventh Street.

“The exhibition We Are Anishinaabe honors native traditions through cloth and beads. The Anishinaabe hold great respect and appreciation for the beauty of their lakes and woodlands home,” says guest curator Margaret Miller. “Through beading and sewing, artists Delina White and her daughters, Sage Davis and Lavender Hunt, share the Anishinaabe way of honoring the nature spirits of their homelands. The designs and materials used in their garments and jewelry show reverence for the environment passed down to them through ancestors. With great attention to symbolic design and detail, White, Hunt and Davis create stunningly, beautiful ensembles in vivid colors that celebrate the traditions of their culture and pride in being Anishinaabe.”

For more information about the exhibit, contact Erica Rasmussen, gallery director, at 651-999-5942 or e-mail her at erica.rasmussen@metrostate.edu.

Metropolitan State University, a member of Minnesota State, is the Twin Cities public, urban, comprehensive state university providing lifelong learning, and competitive academic and professional degree programs at the bachelor, master and doctoral levels.

April 20-July 13: Ecocentric: Art, Ecology, and Engagement is the new exhibit at Gordon Parks Gallery

In the upcoming Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery exhibit, Ecocentric: Art, Ecology and Engagement, the featured artists address environmental issues through their work and engage the public in their creative medium.

Erica Rasmussen, Gordon Parks Gallery director
Erica Rasmussen, Gordon Parks Gallery director

“Ecocentric is a term that was coined in recent years to denote a nature-centered system of values; that which directly opposes anthropocentrism (the idea that humans are the center of the universe), says gallery director Erica Rasmussen about the exhibit. “Like the development of environmentalism that seeks to protect the natural environment, Ecocentrism intends to challenge Western practices associated with culture, science and politics. In the arts there has also been an emergence of ecologically minded individuals who seek to raise our consciousness about pressing environmental issues through solution based artworks. Each of these artists not only addresses environmental issues through their work, but also engages the public in their creative practice.”

Continue reading April 20-July 13: Ecocentric: Art, Ecology, and Engagement is the new exhibit at Gordon Parks Gallery

March 23: “Student Salon 2017” moves into Gordon Parks Gallery

Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery presents Student Salon 2017, featuring multi-media works produced by Metropolitan State students, enrolled in undergraduate programs.

From cast metal sculptures to black and white photography, this exhibit surveys the diverse form and content explored in class and beyond. This year’s exhibition features work produced by three Studio Arts majors: Hannah Gray, Saint Paul; Kimber Starnes, Saint Paul; and Bryan Starry, Minneapolis.

“Some of the work was created in the classroom as part standard assignments. Other pieces were executed beyond the university as part of the students’ individual interests,” said Erica Rasmussen, gallery director. “Whatever the inspiration, it’s a pleasure for me to share the culmination of their artistic pursuits with the university community.”

The exhibit opens with a reception from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, March 23 and continues through April 14. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday to Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday. The gallery is located in the Library and Learning Center, 645 East Seventh Street, at the university’s Saint Paul Campus.

For more information about the exhibit, contact Erica Rasmussen, gallery director, at 651-793-1631 or e-mail her at erica.rasmussen@metrostate.edu.

Kimber Starnes, painting.jpgBryan Starry, sculpture.jpg

 

Gallery opening: “How Do We Remember”

Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery “How Do We Remember?” a solo exhibition by Japanese-American artist Kinji Akagawa, opened Thursday, Jan. 26. In this installation, mixed media drawings adorn the walls and vintage school desks occupy the gallery floor to address the subject of learning.

The exhibit encourages viewers to reflect on their personal experiences of education, identity and vocation.

Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit by sitting at the desks and reflecting on their personal experiences of education, and the shaping of their own identities and vocations. The arrangement of the desks will change from week to week to suggest that learning doesn’t adhere to any particular style or model.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday to Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday. The gallery is located at the university’s Saint Paul Campus in the Library and Learning Center, 645 East Seventh Street. The exhibit will be on display through Feb. 24.

For more information about the exhibit, contact Erica Rasmussen, gallery director, at 651-999-5942 or e-mail erica.rasmussen@metrostate.edu.

The exhibit encourages viewers to reflect on their personal experiences of education, identity and vocation.

“How Do We Remember?” at Gordon Parks Gallery encourages viewers to reflect on their personal experiences of education, identity and vocation

Saint Paul, Minn.— Metropolitan State University Gordon Parks Gallery presents “How Do We Remember?” a solo exhibition by Japanese-American artist Kinji Akagawa. In this installation, mixed media drawings adorn the walls and vintage school desks occupy the gallery floor to address the subject of learning.

Akagawa experienced both the Japanese and American education systems as a student and by having taught at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design for 40 years. Ruminating on the collective and individual experience of learning, he says, “I am interested in study of independent individual-self to the transformative process of becoming a participative ecological-self. This installation shifts the focus from the art-object-making praxis to the relationship-making of being and ‘eventness’: teaching and learning.”

“Although Akagawa is best known for his public sculptures and outdoor gathering places—such as benches, bridges, gardens—this exhibition is an atypical formal and conceptual exploration for the artist,” gallery director Erica Rasmussen said. “Other than the two-dimensional pieces on the walls, the objects in the gallery were manufactured by someone other than the artist. The arrangement and relationship of the desks are part of ‘the given’ and ‘the creative’ act, which asks for emotive and intellectual responses from the viewers.”

Visitors are invited to interact with the exhibit by sitting at the desks and reflecting on their personal experiences of education, and the shaping of their own identities and vocations. The arrangement of the desks will change from week to week, to suggest that learning doesn’t adhere to any particular style or model.

The exhibit opens with a reception from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 26 with a gallery talk and discussion with the artist. The exhibit will be on display through Feb. 24.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday to Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday. The gallery is located at the university’s Saint Paul Campus in the Library and Learning Center, 645 East Seventh Street.

For more information about the exhibit, contact Erica Rasmussen, gallery director,
at 651-999-5942 or e-mail her at erica.rasmussen@metrostate.edu.

Metropolitan State University, a member of Minnesota State, is the Twin Cities’ public, urban, comprehensive state university providing lifelong learning, and competitive academic and professional degree programs at the bachelor, master and doctoral levels.

akagawa-1
In this installation by Japanese-American artist Kinji Akagawa, mixed media drawings adorn the walls and vintage school desks occupy the gallery floor to address the subject of learning.