Tag Archives: School of Urban Education

Michigan Public Radio reviews Nicholas Hartlep’s collected critique of debt-based higher education system

"The Neoliberal Agenda and the Student Debt Crisis in U.S. Higher Education"
“The Neoliberal Agenda and the Student Debt Crisis in U.S. Higher Education”

The “Neoliberal Agenda and the Student Debt Crisis in U.S. Higher Education” is a series of essays co-edited by Nicholas Hartlep, assistant professor in the School of Urban Education at Metropolitan State.

Michigan Public Radio obtained an advance copy of the collection, mentioned in an article on student loan debt.

Partnership of School of Urban Education and Hopkins Public Schools will ease barriers and increase teacher diversity

An ongoing effort by Metropolitan State University and other groups to increase teacher diversity in Minnesota will see fruition with the signing of an agreement that will ease barriers of entry for prospective teachers of color and place them at work in Hopkins Public Schools.

Currently, nearly 30 percent of students in Minnesota schools are students of color and American Indian students, yet 4 percent of their teachers are of color or American Indian. The gap is even wider in many Twin Cities and Greater Minnesota schools with a majority of students of color and American Indian students. Metropolitan State’s School of Urban Education prepares more teachers of color than any other program in the state; currently there are 320 teacher candidates in six licensure programs, and 50 percent are candidates of color.

Representatives from Hopkins School Board and Metropolitan State University’s School of Urban Education (UED) signed the partnership agreement at a School Board Meeting, May 2, at the Eisenhower Community Center (room 233), 1001 MN-7, Hopkins, Minn.


Joe Nathan: All students benefit from diversity among teachers


Hopkins Public Schools is taking an innovative approach made possible during the 2016 legislative session with flexibility to the use of K-12 Achievement and Integration funding to increase K-12 student’s “equitable access to effective and diverse teachers.” The district will hire three UED student teachers as paid “interns” to complete their student teaching experience which is traditionally unpaid.  Increasingly, student teaching is a financial barrier to the profession during the intensive and culminating 12-week, full-time experience during which it is extremely difficult to work any other job to pay for tuition and living expenses. Hopkins will also give priority consideration to UED graduates for licensed teaching positions. Metropolitan State signed an innovative agreement with ISD 279-Osseo Area Schools in January 2017 that provides district paraprofessionals paid leave to student teach within Osseo.

Hopkins Public Schools is an award-winning kindergarten through 12th grade school district serving the city of Hopkins, most of Minnetonka, about half of Golden Valley, and portions of Eden Prairie, Edina, Plymouth, and St. Louis Park. In the 2015-2016 academic year, the district enrolled a richly-diverse K-12 population of about 6,860 students represented by nearly 43 percent students of color and 9 percent English language learners.

The partnership is a result of ongoing legislative advocacy by the Coalition to Increase Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers in Minnesota to increase teacher diversity across the state. Metropolitan State and Hopkins Public Schools are joined with other concerned universities, districts and organizations in this new coalition formed around the common goal to double, by 2020, the current number of teachers of color in the state and ensure that 20 percent of candidates in the teacher preparation pipeline are persons of color or American Indian.

Last August, Metropolitan State University hosted a unique conference organized by the Coalition to Increase Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers in Minnesota designed explicitly for current and aspiring teachers of color. The event was attended by 250 people from more than 100 organizations, school districts, institutions and various racial/ethnic communities throughout the state. The 2017 conference will also be held August 9-11 at Metropolitan State.

The coalition advocates at the state and local levels for the following policies and investments for systemic change needed to address major barriers to the profession and diversify the teacher workforce in the state:

  • Increasing pathways for diverse youth, paraprofessionals and career changers to enter the teaching profession
  • Eliminating discriminatory teacher testing requirements
  • Providing scholarship incentives, student teaching stipends, and loan forgiveness for teaching service
  • Providing induction and retention support
  • Making changes to ensure climate and curriculum are inclusive and culturally relevant in K-12 schools and teacher preparation programs

Joe Nathan: All students benefit from diversity among teachers

“… There appears to be bipartisan agreement to address part of the shortage: the dramatic underrepresentation of teachers of color. State figures show that more than 30 percent of Minnesota K-12 students come from “communities of color” or are American Indian, but less than 5 percent of the state’s teachers represent any of these groups. …”

Read more

Joe Nathan, formerly a Minnesota public school teacher, administrator and PTA president, is director of the Center for School Change. Reactions are welcome at joe@centerforschoolchange.org.

Pioneer Press: ‘Ridiculously overwhelming’: Can reforms to how Minnesota teachers get licensed stop shortage?

“Minnesota faces a growing shortage of teachers in math, science, special education and technical programs. State education leaders hope fixing what has been described as a “broken” licensing process will make it easier for teachers trained out-of-state or in alternative ways to get into Minnesota classrooms…”

“… a more diverse teaching force is essential if Minnesota is going to close one of the nation’s worst academic achievement gaps between poor and minority students and their peers,” says Rene Antrop-Gonzalez, dean of the School of Urban Education at Metropolitan State University.

Read more at the Pioneer Press

Star Tribune: “Osseo Area Schools forms partnership to diversify teacher workforce”

“Osseo Area Schools is collaborating with the university’s school of urban education as part of an effort to recruit more teachers of color.  School districts national and locally are dealing with a shortage in teachers overall as well as teachers of color…

‘Effective teachers who are culturally responsive is mission critical for Osseo Area Schools,’ Superintendent Kate Maguire said at the event.”

Read more at the Star Tribune

 

 

Partnership of School of Urban Education and Osseo Area Schools will ease barriers and increase teacher diversity

Metropolitan State University President Virginia Arthur and representatives from Osseo Area Schools signed a partnership agreement at a ceremony Jan. 30, at Osseo Senior High School.

The agreement enables Metropolitan State’s School of Urban Education (UED) students access to priority placement at Osseo Area Schools for student teaching and priority consideration for hire in Osseo’s paraprofessional and teaching positions. The agreement will increase teacher diversity in Minnesota and ease barriers of entry for prospective teachers of color and place them at work in ISD 279-Osseo Area Schools.

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President Virginia Arthur speaks on the value of Metropolitan State’s new partnership with ISD 279-Osseo Area Schools. This partnership enables urban education pre-service teachers access to priority placement at Osseo Area Schools for student teaching and priority consideration for hire in the district.

Once hired as paraprofessionals, eligible UED students can access Osseo’s career ladder for prospective teachers. The career ladder includes benefits such as paid leave of absence during a student teaching assignment in Osseo Area Schools, first consideration for hire in licensed teaching positions, and up to two additional years of seniority upon achieving continuing contract status.

Signing on behalf of Osseo Area Schools was Superintendent Kate Maguire, E.D.D.

Currently, nearly 30 percent of students in Minnesota schools are students of color and American Indian students, yet 4 percent of their teachers are of color or American Indian. The gap is even wider in many Twin Cities and Greater Minnesota schools with a majority of students of color and American Indian students.

“This is a substantive departure from the traditional student teaching model that puts teacher candidates through 13 to15 weeks of unpaid labor and deters many pre-service teachers of color and American Indian pre-service teachers from becoming licensed teachers. Teacher candidates of color and American Indian teacher candidates often do not have the ability to forgo paid work in order to complete student teaching,” says René Antrop-González, dean of the School of Urban Education at Metropolitan State University.

Metropolitan State delegates at the signing also included Provost Carol Bormann Young,  Tom Cook, special assistant to the president, Greg Mellas, director of the Institute for Community Engagement and Scholarship, professors Rosa Fagundes and Paul Spies of the School of Urban Education, among other faculty and staff. Representatives from Osseo Area Schools also included Judy McDonald, SPHR, executive director of human resources; Kelly Wilson, president, Education Minnesota-Osseo; Becky Hespen, president, Osseo Educational Support Professionals; members of the superintendent’s executive team; other district leaders; and other staff and community members who support this work.

The partnership is a result of ongoing efforts and advocacy by Metropolitan State University,   Minnesota Education Equity Partnership, and the Coalition to Increase Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers in Minnesota to increase teacher diversity across the state. Metropolitan State and Osseo Area Schools are joined with other concerned universities, districts and organizations in this new coalition formed around the common goal to double, by 2020, the current number of teachers of color in the state and ensure that 20 percent of candidates in the teacher preparation pipeline are persons of color or American Indian.

Last August, Metropolitan State University hosted a unique conference organized by the Coalition to Increase Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers in Minnesota designed explicitly for current and aspiring teachers of color. The event was attended by 250 people from more than 100 organizations, school districts, institutions and various racial/ethnic communities throughout the state.

The coalition advocates at the state and local levels for the following policies and investments for systemic change needed to address major barriers to the profession and diversify the teacher workforce in the state:

  • Increasing pathways for diverse youth, paraprofessionals and career changers to enter the teaching profession
  • Eliminating discriminatory teacher testing requirements
  • Providing scholarship incentives, student teaching stipends, and loan forgiveness for teaching service
  • Providing induction and retention support
  • Making changes to ensure climate and curriculum are inclusive and culturally relevant in K-12 schools and teacher preparation programs

50 Over 50 list recognizes two of Metropolitan State faculty

Two Metropolitan State University faculty members have been selected as honorees in the 50 Over 50 list, recognized by AARP Minnesota and Pollen.

Dr. Rose Wan-Mui Chu and Wy Spano are both recognized in the community building category. Chu is associate professor in the School of Urban Education, and Spano is director of the Master of Advocacy and Political Leadership ( MAPL) Program, College of Management.

The list recognizes and celebrates individuals over the age of 50 who have made significant contributions and achievements in their communities.

There will be a celebration event on Thursday, Oct. 13, at Machine Shop in Minneapolis, with a brief recognition ceremony for the honorees and a musical performance by Sonny Knight of Sonny Knight and the Lakers and a keynote address from AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins.

Tickets are $35 and include breakfast. Register at 50Over50MN.eventbrite.com. Organizations can also purchase tables of eight.

 

Advocating, Connecting, Healing, Inspiring, Sharing, Empowering and Transforming for Equity – with audio

Metropolitan State hosted the Summer 2016 Conference for Current and Aspiring Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers, Aug. 10-12.

The opening general session took place in the Founders Hall Auditorium and was led by keynote speaker, Jahana Hayes, National Teacher of the Year.

The conference was organized by The Coalition to Increase Teachers of Color and American Indian Teachers in Minnesota, and sponsored by the Bush Foundation, Minnesota Education Equity Partnership, the Blandin Foundation, and Education Minnesota.

Listen to the keynote speech and panel discussion:

Listen to the Native American Social Songs that were performed:

Aug. 12: Visiting professor Yanyan Guo to give concert

At the conclusion of her one-year visit to Metropolitan State University, Professor Yanyan Guo, visiting scholar from China, School of Urban Education, is giving a solo vocal performance to lead the audience on a journey of exploration through the diverse cultures, traditions and geographies of China.

This one-time concert is 7–8 p.m., Friday, Aug. 12 in the Founders Hall Auditorium, Saint Paul Campus. Admission is free and open to the public.

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Yanyan Gou

Guo’s performance is a celebration of multicultural education at Metropolitan State and incorporates slides, narration and introductions to the people and ethnicities from where her songs originate. The concert will conclude with western operas, a new repertoire Gou has explored during her scholarly journey in the Twin Cities.

Guo is a renowned vocal performer and music teacher in her native China. She’s been a professor at Jiangxi Normal University since 2004. She’s won numerous national competitions and awards, including first prize in the Young Singer Contest in Jiangxi Province in 2014. Her expertise includes Chinese vocal music, folk music, operas, artistic and contemporary songs. Gou came to Metropolitan State last year, supported by a grant from the Chinese Scholar Council.

Performance program to include:

  1. 楚调唐音诗吟:雨霖铃
    (宋)柳永
    Poem chanting: Bells Ringing in the Rain
    (Song Dynasty) Yong Liu
  2. 楚调唐音诗吟:滕王阁序
    (唐)王勃
    Poem chanting: Pavilion of Prince Teng order
    (Tang Dynasty) Bo Wang
  3. 京剧:卜算子。咏梅
    诗:毛泽东 曲:孙玄龄
    Beijing Opera: Ode to the Plum Blossom—to the Tune of Bu Suan Zi
    Poem by Zedong Mao; music by XuanLing Sun
  4. 电影《小花》插曲 :绒花
    词: 刘国富、田农   曲:王酩
    Edelweiss from “Little Flowers”
    Lyrics by Guofu Liu and Nong Tian; music by Min Wang
  5. 新疆民歌: 一杯美酒
    Folk song of Xinjiang: A Cup of Wine
  6. 内蒙谷歌曲: 草原之夜
    词:张加毅     曲 :田歌
    One Night in Pasture
    Lyrics by Jiayi Zhang; music by Ge Tian
  7. 时代歌曲:
    词:黎锦光 曲:黎锦光
    Tuberose
    Lyrics and music by Jingguang Li
  8. Loving you
    Lyrics and music by Minnie Riperton
  9. “Think of Me” from “Phantom of the Opera” by Andrew Lioyd Webber
  10. “Caro Nome ” from “Rigoletto” by Giuseppe Verdi
  11. “Quel Guardo Il Cavaliere” from “Don Pasquale” by Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti
  12. “Chi il bel sogno di Doretta” from “La Rondine” by Giacomo Puccini
  13. 风流江西
    词:朱虹 曲:田信国
    Welcome to Jiangxi
    Lyrics by Hong Zhu; music by Xinguo Tian

Spring semester 2016 outstanding students

Ten students were selected spring semester outstanding students at Metropolitan State. The honored students are Brielle Bernardy, School of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (SLC) graduate; Naw Dah Bu, School of Urban Education; Victoria Bugayev, College of Management (COM) graduate; John Lee Clark, College of Individualized Studies; Nora Dragich, COM undergraduate; Kathryn Herzog, College of Health, Community and Professional Studies (CHCPS) graduate; Maxwell Ingram, SLC undergraduate; Brittney Rademacher, CHCPS undergraduate; Rasmita Shrestha, School of Nursing graduate; and Michael Shyne, College of Arts and Sciences.

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